Citizen science and WebGIS for outdoor advertisement visual pollution assessment

Debates on the encroaching commercialization of public space by outdoor advertising highlight its possible negative impact on local quality of life and enjoyment of public spaces. These overstimulating outdoor advertisements are often considered a source of visual pollution, but cities have no standard way of measuring where it exists and its local impact, and thus cannot regulate it effectively. This study illustrates that visual pollution can be measured in a useful way by relating public opinion to the number of visible advertisements (intervisibility analysis). Using a 2.5D outdoor advertisement (OA) dataset (location and height) of a busy urban street in Lublin, Poland, this preliminary experiment translates visibility into visual pollution. It was found that streetscape views with more than seven visible OAs created visual pollution in this case study. The GIS-based methodology proposed could provide Lublin officials with a basic tool to assess and manage visual pollution, by informing permitting decisions on OAs.

Chmielewski, S., Samulowska, M., Lupa, M., Lee, D., & Zagajewski, B. (2018). Citizen science and WebGIS for outdoor advertisement visual pollution assessment. Computers, Environment and Urban Systems, 67, 97-109.

Measuring visual pollution by outdoor advertisements in an urban street using intervisibilty analysis and public surveys.

Debates on the encroaching commercialization of public space by outdoor advertising highlight its possible negative impact on local quality of life and enjoyment of public spaces. These overstimulating outdoor advertisements are often considered a source of visual pollution, but cities have no standard way of measuring where it exists and its local impact, and thus cannot regulate it effectively. This study illustrates that visual pollution can be measured in a useful way by relating public opinion to the number of visible advertisements (intervisibility analysis). Using a 2.5D outdoor advertisement (OA) dataset (location and height) of a busy urban street in Lublin, Poland, this preliminary experiment translates visibility into visual pollution. It was found that streetscape views with more than seven visible OAs created visual pollution in this case study. The GIS-based methodology proposed could provide Lublin officials with a basic tool to assess and manage visual pollution, by informing permitting decisions on OAs.

Chmielewski, S., Lee, D.J., Tompalski, P., Chmielewski T.J. & Wężyk, P. (2015). International Journal of GIS 30(1). DOI:10.1080/13658816.2015.1104316

GIS-based 3D visibility modeling of outdoor advertising in urban areas.

In this paper, we compare the accuracy of the viewshed approaches to 3D line of sight visibility analysis of outdoor advertisements in two different urban contexts. A solution is tested that transforms LiDAR vegetation points into spherical multipatch objects for rapid and more accurate 3D visibility modeling. This study confirms that a 3D approach performs better than a 2.5D approach and more importantly, that modeling vegetation as 3D spherical multipatches allows us to use LiDAR data in a rapid way to reach highly accurate results (up to 94,3% of overall accuracy) in outdoor advertisements visibility modeling.

Chmielewski, S & Lee, D. J. (2015). SGEM2015 Conference Proceedings, ISBN 978-619-7105-35-3 / ISSN 1314-2704, June 18-24, 2015, Book2 Vol. 2, 923-930 pp DOI: 10.5593/SGEM2015/B22/S11.116

Introduction to Geodesign Developments in Europe. In Geodesign by Integrating Design and Geospatial Sciences

Geodesign in Europe was earmarked by the first Geodesign Summit Europe held in 2013 at the GeoFort, The Netherlands, where researchers and planners from 28 different countries gathered to exchange ideas on how the spatial sciences and design world could be merged. Based on innovations and applications showcased at the Geodesign Summit, this chapter concisely describes geodesign history from a European perspective and provides a definition to streamline future research and practice. Starting from Carl Steinitz’s seminal piece on the geodesign framework, the chapter positions geodesign as a relatively ‘new’ umbrella concept to a group of disparate conventional practices in design and the spatial sciences. ‘Geodesign thinking’ means using spatial technologies to answer ‘what if’ questions to design proposals on aspects like urban visibility, flood risks, sustainability, economic development, heritage appreciation and public engagement. It focuses on how we collaboratively design through geospatial technology, rather than focusing solely on developing the technology or design process. To adopt geodesign thinking, developments in spatial sciences and technology must go hand-in-hand with developments in organizational and educational practices and is a requirement for advancing geodesign into the near future.

Lee, D. J., Dias, E., & Scholten, H. J. (2014). In Geodesign by Integrating Design and Geospatial Sciences (pp. 3-9). Springer International Publishing.

Modelling and observation of heat losses from buildings: The impact of geometric detail on 3D heat flux modelling.

The impact of 3D geometry complexity on the accuracy of simulating radiative, convective and conductive fluxes in an urban canyon was explored. The research involved the collection of meteorological data in an urban canyon in the city of Strasbourg, France, for input into a 3D model called LASER/F, which simulates the aforementioned fluxes. The key input into LASER/F is a 3D geometric model representing the scene (urban canyon). It was hypothesized that more geometric detail in the model would lead to improved accuracy in the simulation but increased computing time. To test this, seven geometry scenarios were prepared with different complexities and test run in LASER/F. The results were validated with thermal images of two facades collected during the field campaign in Strasbourg. 

Lee, D., Pietrzyk, P., Donkers, S., Liem, V., van Oostveen, J., Montazeri, S., Boeters, R., Colin, J., Kastendeuch, P., Nerry, F., Menenti, M., Gorte, B.G.H., & Verbree, E. (2013, June). In Proceedings 33rd EARSel Symposium" Towards Horizon 2020: Earth Observation and Social Perspectives", Matera, Italy, 3-6 June 2013.

Mapping Urban Surface Infiltration Capacity: Segment-based land cover classification with VHR imagery for urban water management and design.

Effective urban water management requires certainty about surface conditions such as the surface infiltration capacity (SIC). A SIC map of an urban catchment area could be a useful input for evidence-based urban design of water-sensitive/low-impact neighbourhoods and multitiered water management schemes for reducing flood vulnerability.

 

Methods for mapping SIC are underdeveloped. Typically, infiltration rates are derived from topographic or urban extent maps. Instead, if a land cover map can precisely identify hydrologically relevant land cover classes, then a more accurate SIC map can be derived. The research explored whether an accurate SIC map could be derived from VHR multi-spectral imagery of Amersfoort, Netherlands, using specific hydrologically relevant land cover classes and segment-based land cover classifiers to achieve meaningful object resolution. The impact of different similarity metrics, rule sets, and data types on classification accuracy were explored. In particular, the impact of lower class specificity (generic classes) was tested. The SIC map was assessed based on impact in a pluvial flood model.

Lee, D. J. (2013). TU Delft, Faculty of Architecture, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences.

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All images and text © 2019 By Danbi Lee